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Why You Need a Backup Sump Pump Battery

Why You Need a Backup Sump Pump Battery

Spring brings rain and winds. Unfortunately, this means that your sump pump may have to work harder to remove water or may go offline due to a power outage. Unfortunately, both of these issues can cause your sump pump to fail. Should either happen, they do not have to cause a plumbing disaster. Having a backup battery for your sump pump can help to prevent many bigger issues that can occur if the sump pump would otherwise be down for some time. Here is some information every sump pump owner should know about sump pump batteries.  Who Should Have a Sump Pump Battery? Sump pumps are most commonly placed in basements or lower spots of a home where water may be able to get in. The sump pump can pump water away from the home, so this type of space does not flood. However, most rely on power to work. If your sump pump loses power or is not functioning properly, due to its age or a lack of maintenance, the battery backup may help your sump pump to function or alert you to the fact that there is something wrong. As such, it is recommended that those who have a sump pump also have a backup battery. What Does a Sump Pump Battery Help to Do? As was mentioned above, the battery backup on a sump pump helps it function and provides you with alarms or alerts if the electric components on a sump pump are not working. This helps to lower the water in the pump, which in turn, helps to prevent flooding that can otherwise happen if...
What You Need to Know About Phantom Flushes

What You Need to Know About Phantom Flushes

There’s a phenomenon known as “ghost flushing” that occasionally happens to home toilets — they start making flushing sounds all on their own! This can be surprising and a little annoying when it happens in the middle of the night or starts happening once or twice a day. In addition to wasting water, it’s also indicating a problem with your toilet. Here’s what is going on, and how you can stop these ghost flushes in their tracks. What’s Going On First, don’t be alarmed. Nothing is alive in your tank, or climbing up and pulling the handle. This flushing is entirely an internal problem. Inside the average house toilet, the tank is closed off from its water source with a valve that’s covered by a round flapper. This flapper is pulled open whenever you flush by moving the handle so that the toilet tank can refill for next time. It’s a simple system, but it works! Usually. Sometimes, the flapper or the chain that connects it to the handle experiences problems, especially problems with sealing the valve properly. In this case, the flapper can suddenly pop open and let a leak escape. This drains water from the toilet over time, which then refills due to movement of the float, and ultimately, it sounds like your toilet is trying to flush itself. How It’s Happening Flappers get old. It happens. When their seal breaks down, all it takes is a small leak for the tank full of water to push the flapper open and drain out all the water and flush itself. This tends to happen at least several hours after...
Why is My Hot Water Running Out So Fast?

Why is My Hot Water Running Out So Fast?

Has your hot water started turning cold? Does it seem like your hot water just isn’t lasting long enough anymore? After checking to make sure no one is taking extra-long showers, it’s time to consider other causes. Here’s why water heaters suddenly become stingy with their hot water. Your Tank is Too Small This often happens after a major renovation or if you just moved into a new home. Hot water tanks vary based on how many gallons they can hold or keep heated. If your tank is smaller than your current needs, you will find that you run out of hot water too quickly and may need a tank upgrade. Keep in mind that switching to a tankless water heater also takes some getting used to, and if you now have a tankless (or solar powered) model, it may be operating differently compared to a traditional water heater. New Appliances are Causing Issues Do you have any new appliances that are suddenly demanding more hot water? Some of these appliances can be quite obvious, like a new tub with hot water jets — those can take up a lot of hot water sometimes, and cut down on the water available for everyone else. Other appliances are more subtle, like a new showerhead that allows more water to flow through and decreases the hot water in your tank much more quickly. You Could Have Sediment Build-Up Sediment that is distilled from water tends to accumulate in hot water tanks over time. In older tanks, sediment can build-up; sometimes, there is so much build-up that it keeps the tank from holding the...
What Causes Low Water Pressure in Your Home?

What Causes Low Water Pressure in Your Home?

Nothing is worse than heading to your bathroom for a nice, hot shower after a long day at work only to find that you barely get a measly trickle instead of the usual flow of water that you expected. After an un-refreshing bathing experience, you start looking for reasons why your water pressure dropped off so suddenly. It may be that when you think about it, you realize that your water pressure has been dropping for quite some time — meaning you’ve got a bigger problem than a broken or frozen pipe. Fortunately, Crawford Mechanical Services has the solution to your low water pressure issues!  Debris in Your Pipes Two of the most common issues with water pressure all tie back to some sort of buildup in your water pipes — either corrosion or debris that gets stuck and holds up the progress of water. If you’re experiencing overall lowered water pressure past a certain point in your home, suspect that the problem is a clog in the pipes. While it can sometimes work itself out, it often takes working with a licensed professional plumber to blast the debris out and restore the flow of water. At Crawford Mechanical Services, we use a high-powered tool called a Hydro Jetter to clear the debris from pipes. Time to Clean! If you’re experiencing low water pressure only in certain rooms, it’s time to consider getting out your gentle scrubbing cleansers and get to work on the shower head or sink aerator screens. This is not necessarily a part that you would consider cleaning on a regular basis, but it can catch significant...
What to Do if Your Pipes Freeze

What to Do if Your Pipes Freeze

No one wants to wake up from their nice warm bed to the sound of water plinking (or spraying!) throughout the house, especially during the cold winter months. If you live somewhere that’s being hit by freezing weather this year; there’s a good chance that you’ll be dealing with frozen pipes at some point during the winter season. Whether you performed the recommended maintenance to get your pipes ready for winter or decided to give it a pass this year, there are some steps you’ll want to take quickly when your pipes freeze — or risk getting stuck with a massive mess both on your floors and throughout your plumbing systems.  Keep Pipes Flowing If you goofed and didn’t leave your sink dripping last night and woke up to frozen pipes, it’s not too late to open up that faucet! Even if nothing is dripping immediately, allowing the water pressure to continue coming through the pipes will help to get the ice melted more quickly. Next time, leave a tiny dripping of water going through the pipes to keep everything from freezing solid. Carefully Apply Heat Let’s start out with what NOT to do — never use a propane heater, blowtorch or any other method of open flame on your pipes in an effort to do a quick defrost. Not only is this dangerous to yourself and your home on many levels, but it’s not going to do your pipes any good either! Instead, look for ways to slowly reduce the ice within the pipes, such as a small portable space heater that is a safe distance from any materials...