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Moving Into an Older Home? Here Are the 4 Most Common Issues You May Run Into

Moving Into an Older Home? Here Are the 4 Most Common Issues You May Run Into

Are you looking into buying an older home? You are not alone. Purchasing older homes is becoming increasingly popular for many reasons. These reasons include people wanting to expand their real estate portfolio, “fixer-upper” projects and the fact that it’s generally less expensive to buy an older home. But what are the common issues that affect old homes? In this post, we will detail what to look for in an old home. What Is an Old Home? The definition of an “old home” varies, depending on who you ask. The oldest homes in the United States date back to the 1600s. Here are some of the oldest houses in America. The Fairbanks House, Massachusetts: 1637 C.A. Nothnagle Log House, New Jersey: 1638 Rev. Henry Whitfield’s House, Connecticut: 1639 Richard Sparrow House, Massachusetts: 1640 Loomis Homestead, Connecticut: 1640 However, your home doesn’t have to date back to 1640 to meet the criteria of an older home. While opinions are subjective, many prospective homebuyers might consider homes built in the 1960s and earlier as old. One source for what defines an old home is the National Register of Historic Places. In general, a home must be at least 50 years old for inclusion on this venerable list. Plumbing Plumbing is one of the prevalent problems an owner of an old home can expect to experience. One of the most common old home plumbing issues is that some houses have pipes made with materials that no longer meet United States building codes. Below are three of the most common outdated materials used to build pipes. Polybutylene: Pipes made of polybutylene were popular...
The Best Touchless Fixtures for Your Bathroom

The Best Touchless Fixtures for Your Bathroom

People always look for new ways to innovate and increase their efficiency in all aspects of day-to-day life. Touchless fixtures are an innovative choice and make the bathroom experience more beneficial for anyone who uses the restroom and those who embrace this technology for their home or business — going hands-free is a safer, more efficient and cost-effective option. You have probably witnessed the convenience of hands-free faucets and touchless toilets in many commercial businesses, and these same fixtures will make a statement in your modern residential bathroom. Competitive businesses looking to level the playing field can similarly benefit from touchless fixtures. Save time and money when you invest in touchless fixtures for your business or home. Standard Touchless Fixtures for Your Business and Home As the name implies, touchless fixtures are any plumbing fixtures that do not require the user to physically touch a handle, button or knob to turn them on. These fixtures automatically complete everyday tasks and eliminate unnecessary touchpoints related to manual control. Touchless fixtures provide regulated, hands-free control and ensure efficient water usage. It’s no wonder business owners have installed touchless faucets and toilets in their public spaces. In addition to public restrooms, touchless fixtures are becoming more prevalent in residential units and houses. Touchless fixtures may offer the perfect solution for your next home improvement renovation. You can install bathroom fixtures with the latest touchless technology in your home today. Over recent years, manufacturers have perfected multiple hands-free options to create the most valuable, advanced designs for your benefit. How Do Touchless Fixtures Work? Touchless fixtures use built-in sensors to detect when a user is...
How Long Should My Sump Pump Last? 5 Signs It’s Time to Replace

How Long Should My Sump Pump Last? 5 Signs It’s Time to Replace

A sump pump is a basement waterproofing system that prevents water damage. While this system is generally reliable, at some point it will not perform as well as it once did and will need to be replaced. This guide goes over common signs of sump pump failure and decline so you’ll know when to replace your pump. 1. Your Sump Pump Is Old How long your sump pump lasts will depend on the quality of your unit and how well it has been maintained. The average life span of a sump pump is between five and seven years, although some units last several decades. Certain pedestal pumps can even run for as long as 30 years. However, whether the estimated life span of your sump pump is five years or 20 years, you should always keep tabs on the performance of your unit, even if it is still relatively new. 2. It Runs Constantly If your pump runs constantly — even in sunny weather — you’ll likely have to replace it. If your sump pump is always running, this means it can’t handle the amount of water coming into the unit. Many factors could cause your pump to run excessively: You might have a problem with a switch or float arm mechanisms. You might have a missing or broken valve. Your sump pump might not be the right size to accommodate the needs of your home. Your sump pump might have shifted in the basin, making the float unresponsive. Constant rainfall is causing your sump pump to go into overdrive. Sump pumps that constantly run will be unable to...
Four Signs You Need to Install a New Water Service

Four Signs You Need to Install a New Water Service

Your water service is one of the essential components of your house. While all pipes are important for keeping your household running, your water service is particularly important because of the integral role it plays in supplying water for your home’s plumbing system. Your water service runs underground from your house to the street, connects to the municipal water main and brings in fresh, clean water for drinking, bathing and other use. Water lines can usually last for decades, but at some point, even these sturdy pipes will wear out. When they do, they can diminish your water quality or damage your home and yard. Fortunately, a few telltale signs can alert you to a problem with your water line. Four Signs That Can Suggest an Issue With Your Water Service What are some signs your water service isn’t working? Below are four critical signals that might indicate a problem with your water service: 1. A Soggy Lawn A soggy lawn is a sure signal that your water line needs replacement. The reason is that your water service runs underneath your yard, so if it springs a leak, it can slowly flood your lawn with water. If the ground feels squishy or you see standing pools of water in your yard, you may need a new water service. Especially in the summer, when hot and sunny days mean fewer rain puddles in your yard, you should suspect a cracked water service if standing water appears. Remember that your sewer main also runs beneath your lawn — so if the water in your yard looks discolored or smells like sewage, call a professional immediately...
3 Spring Plumbing Maintenance Tasks to Tackle

3 Spring Plumbing Maintenance Tasks to Tackle

Spring is officially here! As excited as you are to spend more time outside, there is some plumbing maintenance you’ll need to put on your to-do list before the fun can begin. Here’s what you’ll need to do.  Check Sump Pump April showers bring, well, lots of things, including a wet and soggy basement. Most of us don’t have the luxury of a dry basement, but we do have the blessing of a sump pump to assure that our basement is dry and our houses don’t get musty. To ensure that your sump pump is working properly, you will need to check it in early spring. Unplug the pump and then plug it in again. If the pump doesn’t start you’ll need to call a plumber. Another way is to pour enough water to raise the float until the pump kicks on, make sure it drains. At Crawford Mechanical Services, we suggest having a backup sump pump just in case your main sump pump fails, or you lose power to your house; this will help you guarantee that a potential flood won’t happen in your basement. Give Your Drains More Attention You shouldn’t have a bog of stench in your drains or slow draining water. With a bit of attention and checking to clear the debris from your drains, your pipes can flow smoothly once again. Check to make sure there are strainers placed in all your drains to prevent hair and other debris from spoiling in the pipes and resulting in a clog. This can be solved with a drain cleaner, but sometimes a plumbing snake handled by a plumbing professional is required. Outdoor Faucets...
Why is My Hot Water Running Out So Fast?

Why is My Hot Water Running Out So Fast?

Has your hot water started turning cold? Does it seem like your hot water just isn’t lasting long enough anymore? After checking to make sure no one is taking extra-long showers, it’s time to consider other causes. Here’s why water heaters suddenly become stingy with their hot water. Your Tank is Too Small This often happens after a major renovation or if you just moved into a new home. Hot water tanks vary based on how many gallons they can hold or keep heated. If your tank is smaller than your current needs, you will find that you run out of hot water too quickly and may need a tank upgrade. Keep in mind that switching to a tankless water heater also takes some getting used to, and if you now have a tankless (or solar powered) model, it may be operating differently compared to a traditional water heater. New Appliances are Causing Issues Do you have any new appliances that are suddenly demanding more hot water? Some of these appliances can be quite obvious, like a new tub with hot water jets — those can take up a lot of hot water sometimes, and cut down on the water available for everyone else. Other appliances are more subtle, like a new showerhead that allows more water to flow through and decreases the hot water in your tank much more quickly. You Could Have Sediment Build-Up Sediment that is distilled from water tends to accumulate in hot water tanks over time. In older tanks, sediment can build-up; sometimes, there is so much build-up that it keeps the tank from holding the...