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How Long Should My Sump Pump Last? 5 Signs It’s Time to Replace

How Long Should My Sump Pump Last? 5 Signs It’s Time to Replace

A sump pump is a basement waterproofing system that prevents water damage. While this system is generally reliable, at some point it will not perform as well as it once did and will need to be replaced. This guide goes over common signs of sump pump failure and decline so you’ll know when to replace your pump. 1. Your Sump Pump Is Old How long your sump pump lasts will depend on the quality of your unit and how well it has been maintained. The average life span of a sump pump is between five and seven years, although some units last several decades. Certain pedestal pumps can even run for as long as 30 years. However, whether the estimated life span of your sump pump is five years or 20 years, you should always keep tabs on the performance of your unit, even if it is still relatively new. 2. It Runs Constantly If your pump runs constantly — even in sunny weather — you’ll likely have to replace it. If your sump pump is always running, this means it can’t handle the amount of water coming into the unit. Many factors could cause your pump to run excessively: You might have a problem with a switch or float arm mechanisms. You might have a missing or broken valve. Your sump pump might not be the right size to accommodate the needs of your home. Your sump pump might have shifted in the basin, making the float unresponsive. Constant rainfall is causing your sump pump to go into overdrive. Sump pumps that constantly run will be unable to...
Four Signs You Need to Install a New Water Service

Four Signs You Need to Install a New Water Service

Your water service is one of the essential components of your house. While all pipes are important for keeping your household running, your water service is particularly important because of the integral role it plays in supplying water for your home’s plumbing system. Your water service runs underground from your house to the street, connects to the municipal water main and brings in fresh, clean water for drinking, bathing and other use. Water lines can usually last for decades, but at some point, even these sturdy pipes will wear out. When they do, they can diminish your water quality or damage your home and yard. Fortunately, a few telltale signs can alert you to a problem with your water line. Four Signs That Can Suggest an Issue With Your Water Service What are some signs your water service isn’t working? Below are four critical signals that might indicate a problem with your water service: 1. A Soggy Lawn A soggy lawn is a sure signal that your water line needs replacement. The reason is that your water service runs underneath your yard, so if it springs a leak, it can slowly flood your lawn with water. If the ground feels squishy or you see standing pools of water in your yard, you may need a new water service. Especially in the summer, when hot and sunny days mean fewer rain puddles in your yard, you should suspect a cracked water service if standing water appears. Remember that your sewer main also runs beneath your lawn — so if the water in your yard looks discolored or smells like sewage, call a professional immediately...
3 Spring Plumbing Maintenance Tasks to Tackle

3 Spring Plumbing Maintenance Tasks to Tackle

Spring is officially here! As excited as you are to spend more time outside, there is some plumbing maintenance you’ll need to put on your to-do list before the fun can begin. Here’s what you’ll need to do.  Check Sump Pump April showers bring, well, lots of things, including a wet and soggy basement. Most of us don’t have the luxury of a dry basement, but we do have the blessing of a sump pump to assure that our basement is dry and our houses don’t get musty. To ensure that your sump pump is working properly, you will need to check it in early spring. Unplug the pump and then plug it in again. If the pump doesn’t start you’ll need to call a plumber. Another way is to pour enough water to raise the float until the pump kicks on, make sure it drains. At Crawford Mechanical Services, we suggest having a backup sump pump just in case your main sump pump fails, or you lose power to your house; this will help you guarantee that a potential flood won’t happen in your basement. Give Your Drains More Attention You shouldn’t have a bog of stench in your drains or slow draining water. With a bit of attention and checking to clear the debris from your drains, your pipes can flow smoothly once again. Check to make sure there are strainers placed in all your drains to prevent hair and other debris from spoiling in the pipes and resulting in a clog. This can be solved with a drain cleaner, but sometimes a plumbing snake handled by a plumbing professional is required. Outdoor Faucets...
Why is My Hot Water Running Out So Fast?

Why is My Hot Water Running Out So Fast?

Has your hot water started turning cold? Does it seem like your hot water just isn’t lasting long enough anymore? After checking to make sure no one is taking extra-long showers, it’s time to consider other causes. Here’s why water heaters suddenly become stingy with their hot water. Your Tank is Too Small This often happens after a major renovation or if you just moved into a new home. Hot water tanks vary based on how many gallons they can hold or keep heated. If your tank is smaller than your current needs, you will find that you run out of hot water too quickly and may need a tank upgrade. Keep in mind that switching to a tankless water heater also takes some getting used to, and if you now have a tankless (or solar powered) model, it may be operating differently compared to a traditional water heater. New Appliances are Causing Issues Do you have any new appliances that are suddenly demanding more hot water? Some of these appliances can be quite obvious, like a new tub with hot water jets — those can take up a lot of hot water sometimes, and cut down on the water available for everyone else. Other appliances are more subtle, like a new showerhead that allows more water to flow through and decreases the hot water in your tank much more quickly. You Could Have Sediment Build-Up Sediment that is distilled from water tends to accumulate in hot water tanks over time. In older tanks, sediment can build-up; sometimes, there is so much build-up that it keeps the tank from holding the...
What Causes Low Water Pressure in Your Home?

What Causes Low Water Pressure in Your Home?

Nothing is worse than heading to your bathroom for a nice, hot shower after a long day at work only to find that you barely get a measly trickle instead of the usual flow of water that you expected. After an un-refreshing bathing experience, you start looking for reasons why your water pressure dropped off so suddenly. It may be that when you think about it, you realize that your water pressure has been dropping for quite some time — meaning you’ve got a bigger problem than a broken or frozen pipe. Fortunately, Crawford Mechanical Services has the solution to your low water pressure issues!  Debris in Your Pipes Two of the most common issues with water pressure all tie back to some sort of buildup in your water pipes — either corrosion or debris that gets stuck and holds up the progress of water. If you’re experiencing overall lowered water pressure past a certain point in your home, suspect that the problem is a clog in the pipes. While it can sometimes work itself out, it often takes working with a licensed professional plumber to blast the debris out and restore the flow of water. At Crawford Mechanical Services, we use a high-powered tool called a Hydro Jetter to clear the debris from pipes. Time to Clean! If you’re experiencing low water pressure only in certain rooms, it’s time to consider getting out your gentle scrubbing cleansers and get to work on the shower head or sink aerator screens. This is not necessarily a part that you would consider cleaning on a regular basis, but it can catch significant...
What to Do if Your Pipes Freeze

What to Do if Your Pipes Freeze

No one wants to wake up from their nice warm bed to the sound of water plinking (or spraying!) throughout the house, especially during the cold winter months. If you live somewhere that’s being hit by freezing weather this year; there’s a good chance that you’ll be dealing with frozen pipes at some point during the winter season. Whether you performed the recommended maintenance to get your pipes ready for winter or decided to give it a pass this year, there are some steps you’ll want to take quickly when your pipes freeze — or risk getting stuck with a massive mess both on your floors and throughout your plumbing systems.  Keep Pipes Flowing If you goofed and didn’t leave your sink dripping last night and woke up to frozen pipes, it’s not too late to open up that faucet! Even if nothing is dripping immediately, allowing the water pressure to continue coming through the pipes will help to get the ice melted more quickly. Next time, leave a tiny dripping of water going through the pipes to keep everything from freezing solid. Carefully Apply Heat Let’s start out with what NOT to do — never use a propane heater, blowtorch or any other method of open flame on your pipes in an effort to do a quick defrost. Not only is this dangerous to yourself and your home on many levels, but it’s not going to do your pipes any good either! Instead, look for ways to slowly reduce the ice within the pipes, such as a small portable space heater that is a safe distance from any materials...